Policing and policy on prostitution during London 2012 Olympics: “Harm Was Done”

Policing and policy on prostitution during London 2012 Olympics: “Harm Was Done”.

Frontline services say:

  • our expertise was ignored
  • vulnerable women were put in danger
  • there was greater risk to public health
  • policy was based on ideology not reality

Despite all the hype about trafficking and prostitution in the run up to the Olympics, no service interviewed saw more people selling sex or more potential victims of trafficking – just as well, since none received substantial increased funds and two had substantial cuts to the service they could offer. One interviewee for our report (see Notes) commented “All this panic and hype, but no money for services!”

Support services say:

  • “The Games were used as an opportunity to perpetuate the myths around prostitution and major sporting events by organisations and individuals who take an ideological view of prostitution, rather than one informed by the evidence base.”
  • “[Many of the attendees at the GLA meetings] didn’t seem to know anything about the ordinary reality of the sex industry in London, and when you talked about that it was like being the kid pointing out the emperor’s new clothes, nobody wanted to know.”
  • “Policy was based on the ideology – the belief that prostitution is a form of exploitation – of a few projects who were driving the agenda and using trafficking to get support for their work, both financial and political.”

And the harm continues – one service provider said “It’s not just the Olympics – they’re still shutting places down and they don’t think of the consequences for the women, it’s driving it underground and we don’t get any access to deliver services at all. Women still have families living in poverty, they still have to make a living, and they’re less safe doing it.”

An IUSW report for International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers (17 December) reveals that concerns raised by frontline services for people in the sex industry were ignored by the GLA’s “Sexual Exploitation” group. Services say:

  • “[Sex workers are] less likely to report crimes because they don’t trust the police as much as they used to”
  • “It was just horrendous. Women being thrown out [of brothels] with no regard for their safety” “Places you’d been going to for ages would close, and you’d lose touch with all the people you’d been supporting there”
  • “If [policy makers] listened to us, they wouldn’t have done what they did.”

 

Notes
Click here for the full report “Harm Was Done: prostitution, politics and power in the run up to the 2012 London Olympics”, produced by the International Union of Sex Workers to mark International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers. This annual event (every 17 December) was created by sex workers as a way to speak out against those who would silence us, whether by direct violence, the violence of the state, or those who would rather speak for or about us than listen to us.

The IUSW is an organisation of people currently working in the sex industry, together with allies who respect our equal entitlement to human rights and freedom from discrimination and supporters of policy based on evidence and in reality.

The “Harm Was Done” report consists of interviews with staff from seven services that support thousands of sex workers – UK born and migrant, female, male and trans – right across London.

The International Union of Sex Workers www.iusw.org
Copyright © 2012 International Union of Sex Workers, All rights reserved.
Press Release

Our mailing address is:
International Union of Sex Workers
IUSW c/o MSH Suite C Maples Business Centre
144 Liverpool Road
London, England N1 1LA
United Kingdom

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4 Responses to “Policing and policy on prostitution during London 2012 Olympics: “Harm Was Done””

  1. [...] would focus on “the johns” and “demand”, outreach workers reported that the police made it harder for them to provide sex workers with safer supplies, health information, and service referrals. [...]

  2. [...] would focus on “the johns” and “demand”, outreach workers reported that the police made it harder for them to provide sex workers with safer supplies, health information, and service referrals. [...]

  3. [...] would focus on “the johns” and “demand”, outreach workers reported that the police made it harder for them to provide sex workers with safer supplies, health information, and service referrals. [...]

  4. Melanie Mitchell says:

    Just wanted to find out information on prostitution. Thank you